http://www.slade40years.com/, Slade, Dave Hill, Don Powell, Jim Lea, Noddy Holder, Glamrock, Slade40years, Don Powell Fanclub, Wolverhampton, Bilston,
 


Slade article in Gazeta Uzetka, Poland 2010

Slade article in Gazeta Uzetka, Poland 2010

 

 

http://www.gazeta.uzetka.pl/files/euzetka/pdf/20101206233547.pdf

03.03.2005 Yorkshire Evening Post: Slade in the sun

 

IT'S often the case that the farther you stray from home, the more likely you are to be led right back. The older and wiser you grow, the more frequent are reminders of where you started – when you were young and silly.

 

We'd seen him somewhere before. My pal Graham and I – doing our annual play-out on Barbados – thought he looked familiar, as he idled over breakfast with his wife in the sunshine. Had we met last year?

 

"No, never been before. We always go to Bournemouth."

 

So, he must be from Yorkshire.

 

"No. Wolverhampton, actually."

 

Dealings with the Press?
"Now and again... through work."

 

"And what is it you do?"

 

"I'm a musician in a band."

 

"Oh... would we know the band?"

 

"Possibly. Have you heard of Slade?"

 

Pennies drop with a humiliating clatter, when you're caught with brain in neutral. But as his facial features made contact with the memory section of hurriedly engaged grey matter, all become clear. Dave Hill, Slade's outrageously flamboyant, glammed-up lead guitarist with silver platforms and eccentric fringe, hadn't really changed at all – in spite of years spent holidaying in Bournemouth.

 

Full circle of life's quirky trickery completed at lunchtime when, over a glass of wine or three, Dave let slip his passion for cancer research in Yorkshire.

 

No passing fancy this. He'd been intimately involved in efforts to expand and improve research facilities for more than two years; since his brother-in-law – a Yorkshireman – had been given only months to live.

 

So far away and yet right back home, through chance encounter with one to whom a young girl had danced her feet sore in discos. It didn't surprise Dave one bit. His whole life has been directed by quirk and coincidence.

 

"Thank God I picked up a guitar as a kid and found I was good at it," he said. "I could have been in that Tarmac office all my life, otherwise. Council house kids in Wolverhampton didn't get too many chances in those days."

 

Dave's an unassuming, entertaining, openly friendly man who – as he approaches 59 – has no qualms about counting his continuing blessings. He has been married to Jan for 31 years – remarkable considering the business he's in – and they're as happy as newly weds. Best friends too – which is no doubt their secret.

 

But flies have a disturbing knack of falling indiscriminately into anybody's ointment and a little over two years ago, when Dave's brother-in-law David Harvey was told throat cancer was to leave him with little chance of survival, that he was to lose his tongue and therefore his speech, the whole family was knocked sideways.

 

Dave's sister Carol was distraught.

 

"David's options were grim," said Dave. "Actually they amounted to no option at all. Then, after ages trawling the Internet and every source we could drag up, we found a marvellous Yorkshire surgeon called Nick Stafford, based in Hull.

 

"He was the only one who could offer us any optimism and he took David on as his patient. He didn't lose his tongue. He didn't die in three months. It's more than two years now and he's doing fine. So, when Nick told us he wanted to raise funds for cancer research in Yorkshire, we bought in big-time."

 

Nick Stafford, Professor of Head and Neck Surgery at Hull University Hospital, shares Dave's passion for Yorkshire's cancer research development and is key figure in Hull's Daisy Appeal which has so far raised nearly £3m in just two years towards the £6m needed for a research and clinical trials centre to benefit the whole of the county – and of course, beyond.

 

"The purpose of the centre will be to facilitate new research into cancer and cardio-vascular conditions and from which clinical trials can be conducted, which will certainly be of enormous benefit locally," he said. "Any new research opportunity will of course be of enormous benefit right through Yorkshire."

 

The Daisy Appeal is to stage a fundraising ball at the Hull KC Stadium on March 18 and once again Dave Hill is keen to contribute.

 

"I'm donating a guitar – a Les Paul – for auction," he said. "I'll do anything to help this cause.

 

"Previously I've given gold discs but they keep coming back – like boomerangs. I gave them my gold disc for Slade Alive and it sold for about £20,000. The guy who paid for it sent it back to me, saying he hadn't the heart to keep it because it was my first.

 

"I donated it again and it was sold again – I wouldn't be at all surprised if it didn't come back again, people are like that in Yorkshire."

 

David Harvey will be at the ball. Although he has now moved from Yorkshire to live in Cyprus, March 18 is his check-up day and as a prime mover in raising money for the new centre, he wouldn't miss it for the world.

 

And as Dave Hill – who still tours Europe and the UK with Slade (but without Noddy Holder) – pondered his musical commitments, while sipping chilled white wine by the pool at Cobblers Cove Hotel – he too hoped to make one in, back in Yorkshire.

 

"Yeah, it's funny we should meet here like this and talk about the work going on back home – but that's the way life is," he said. "It's always thrown up surprises and opportunities for me. I stopped worrying about little things a long time ago. Best way is to let things happen and then make the most of them."

 

Still the romantic fatalist then?

 

"Never could be anything else," he said. "I always have been a bit of a romantic. Always was the one who wanted to be the pretty one in my glitter suits and platforms. I wanted to be Davey Jones (Monkees) for goodness sake – could never get my head round skinhead aggression. Never wanted much to do with sex, drugs and rock and roll.

 

"Jan and I met long before Slade was famous. We fell in love and stayed in love. We were lucky – we are still lucky and you make the most of your luck and be thankful for it.

 

"So, next year I think we'll give Bournemouth a miss and come back here. It feels warm, good... and lucky."

 

anne.pickles@ypn.co.uk

Anne Pickles
UK AND YORKSHIRE FEATURE WRITER OF THE YEAR AND YORKSHIRE JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR

 

We'd seen him somewhere before. My pal Graham and I – doing our annual play-out on Barbados – thought he looked familiar, as he idled over breakfast with his wife in the sunshine. Had we met last year?

"No, never been before. We always go to Bournemouth."

 

So, he must be from Yorkshire.

 

"No. Wolverhampton, actually."

 

Dealings with the Press?

 

"Now and again... through work."

 

"And what is it you do?"

 

"I'm a musician in a band."

 

"Oh... would we know the band?"

 

"Possibly. Have you heard of Slade?"

 

Pennies drop with a humiliating clatter, when you're caught with brain in neutral. But as his facial features made contact with the memory section of hurriedly engaged grey matter, all become clear. Dave Hill, Slade's outrageously flamboyant, glammed-up lead guitarist with silver platforms and eccentric fringe, hadn't really changed at all – in spite of years spent holidaying in Bournemouth.

 

Full circle of life's quirky trickery completed at lunchtime when, over a glass of wine or three, Dave let slip his passion for cancer research in Yorkshire.

 

No passing fancy this. He'd been intimately involved in efforts to expand and improve research facilities for more than two years; since his brother-in-law – a Yorkshireman – had been given only months to live.

 

So far away and yet right back home, through chance encounter with one to whom a young girl had danced her feet sore in discos. It didn't surprise Dave one bit. His whole life has been directed by quirk and coincidence.

 

"Thank God I picked up a guitar as a kid and found I was good at it," he said. "I could have been in that Tarmac office all my life, otherwise. Council house kids in Wolverhampton didn't get too many chances in those days."

 

Dave's an unassuming, entertaining, openly friendly man who – as he approaches 59 – has no qualms about counting his continuing blessings. He has been married to Jan for 31 years – remarkable considering the business he's in – and they're as happy as newly weds. Best friends too – which is no doubt their secret.

 

But flies have a disturbing knack of falling indiscriminately into anybody's ointment and a little over two years ago, when Dave's brother-in-law David Harvey was told throat cancer was to leave him with little chance of survival, that he was to lose his tongue and therefore his speech, the whole family was knocked sideways.

Dave's sister Carol was distraught.

 

"David's options were grim," said Dave. "Actually they amounted to no option at all. Then, after ages trawling the Internet and every source we could drag up, we found a marvellous Yorkshire surgeon called Nick Stafford, based in Hull.

 

"He was the only one who could offer us any optimism and he took David on as his patient. He didn't lose his tongue. He didn't die in three months. It's more than two years now and he's doing fine. So, when Nick told us he wanted to raise funds for cancer research in Yorkshire, we bought in big-time."

 

Nick Stafford, Professor of Head and Neck Surgery at Hull University Hospital, shares Dave's passion for Yorkshire's cancer research development and is key figure in Hull's Daisy Appeal which has so far raised nearly £3m in just two years towards the £6m needed for a research and clinical trials centre to benefit the whole of the county – and of course, beyond.

 

"The purpose of the centre will be to facilitate new research into cancer and cardio-vascular conditions and from which clinical trials can be conducted, which will certainly be of enormous benefit locally," he said. "Any new research opportunity will of course be of enormous benefit right through Yorkshire."

 

The Daisy Appeal is to stage a fundraising ball at the Hull KC Stadium on March 18 and once again Dave Hill is keen to contribute.

 

"I'm donating a guitar – a Les Paul – for auction," he said. "I'll do anything to help this cause.

 

"Previously I've given gold discs but they keep coming back – like boomerangs. I gave them my gold disc for Slade Alive and it sold for about £20,000. The guy who paid for it sent it back to me, saying he hadn't the heart to keep it because it was my first.

 

"I donated it again and it was sold again – I wouldn't be at all surprised if it didn't come back again, people are like that in Yorkshire."

 

David Harvey will be at the ball. Although he has now moved from Yorkshire to live in Cyprus, March 18 is his check-up day and as a prime mover in raising money for the new centre, he wouldn't miss it for the world.

 

And as Dave Hill – who still tours Europe and the UK with Slade (but without Noddy Holder) – pondered his musical commitments, while sipping chilled white wine by the pool at Cobblers Cove Hotel – he too hoped to make one in, back in Yorkshire.

 

"Yeah, it's funny we should meet here like this and talk about the work going on back home – but that's the way life is," he said. "It's always thrown up surprises and opportunities for me. I stopped worrying about little things a long time ago. Best way is to let things happen and then make the most of them."

 

Still the romantic fatalist then?

 

"Never could be anything else," he said. "I always have been a bit of a romantic. Always was the one who wanted to be the pretty one in my glitter suits and platforms. I wanted to be Davey Jones (Monkees) for goodness sake – could never get my head round skinhead aggression. Never wanted much to do with sex, drugs and rock and roll.

 

"Jan and I met long before Slade was famous. We fell in love and stayed in love. We were lucky – we are still lucky and you make the most of your luck and be thankful for it.

 

"So, next year I think we'll give Bournemouth a miss and come back here. It feels warm, good... and lucky."

 

anne.pickles@ypn.co.uk

Anne Pickles

UK AND YORKSHIRE FEATURE WRITER OF THE YEAR AND YORKSHIRE JOURNALIST OF THE YEAR


 

Yorkshire Evening Post 03.03.2005 Slade in the sun

 

SLADE - Vive le Rock November 2009

Written by Ian Chaddock

Thursday, 05 November 2009

THE HISTORY

Known as one of the most recognisable bands of the glam rock movement in the late 70’s, they originated from the Black Country in the West Midlands,the band started out as: N’Betweens in 1966. They had little success, except for local shows. Things started to pick up towards the end of the 1960’s and the band changed their name to Ambrose Slade.

•    The band met manager: Chas Chandler (ex manager of Jimi Hendrix) In a London Club called "Rasputin" who offered to take over management. Following this, the band changed their name again for the last time to just ‘ Slade’.

•    The band sported a skin-head look as a gimmick and to create publicity for what was then to become a newsworthy fashion trend. The connotations and stereotypes attached to the Skinhead look made the band revert back to wanting long hair, so unsurprisingly let it grow again.

•    With a full head of hair and just in time for the glam rock movement, the band released deliberately mis-spelt songs with a black-country style.

•    In 1971, Slade began to have recognition with their first UK top 20 hit entitled: ‘Get Down and Get With It’ and ending the year on a high note with song ‘Coz I Luv You’.

•    Written by Noddy Holder and Jim Lea, Merry Xmas everybody was released December 1973, now one of the most iconic songs used in the UK.

•    A string of massive hits followed including no 1 char toppers ‘Look Wot You Dun’, ‘Muma Weer All Crazee Now’, ‘Cum On Feel The Noize’ and ‘Skweeze Me Pleeze Me’.

•    Not only were Slade conquering the singles charts, they also topped the album charts with: number one albums: ‘Slayed?’ ‘Sladest’ and ‘Old New Borrowed Blue’.

•    Slade were the most successful band since the Beatles.

•    On the 4th July 1973, Don had a terrible car accident which pronounced the death of his girlfriend, and Don himself found himself in a deep coma. Dom recovered physically, but still to this day struggles with his memory.

•    In 1976, Slade turn their attention over to across the pond. Cracking America is always a huge step for anyone, and this was to be proven. Slade moved to New York for 2 years, and supported world renowned bands Aerosmith and Kiss on their tours. Unfortunately they failed to receive any success from doing so. With this in mind, Slade returned back to the UK.

•    Upon returning to the UK, they realised that a lot had changed and moved on without them. Slade were no longer recognised, and had to play the smaller venues again to re-establish themselves within the music scene. This was a real shock for members Dave and Don who relied upon touring money to survive, as they were not receiving any royalties from any of the songs.

•    Dave left the band, and decided to earn a living out of his Rolls Royce that he owned, by renting it out for weddings and special occasions.

•    August 1980, Slade were offered to play what was Ozzy Ozbourne’s Reading Festival slot, as Ozzy had dropped out at last minute. Dave rejoined for the gig, and played to an astonishing 50,000 people. Slade stole the show!

•    With Slade back in business and ever popular, they used this to their advantage and released another album entitled: ’We’ll Bring The House Down’ which reached number 25 in the charts.

•    In 1983, Slade reached number 2 in the UK charts with the single ‘My Oh My’ and then in 1984 they released the album: ‘The Amazing Kamikaze Syndrome’ which reached 49 in the UK charts and for their first time ever, also charted in the US at no.33.

•    Releasing several more singles  and albums, success was no longer on the books so Noddy and Jim took the decision to quit and pursue other career opportunities. Dave and Don continue to tour with ‘Slade II’. Jim is now a physiotherapist and Noddy has become a recognised face within Radio and TV as a presenter.

 

The excellent new double album ‘SLADE-LIVE AT THE BBC’ is out now on Salvo records.

Words: Chloe Gillard

 

RECOMMENDED SLADE

“Slade was certainly our greatest influence; not only in the crafting of rock songs but also as performers. Before lade, no one really knew shit about how to  make an audience riot. We really got off on that. There would probably nevebe us without them.” Gene Simmons (Kiss)

"I spent most of the early 70s listening to Slade Alive thinking to myself,"Wow - this is what I want to do.I want to make that kind of intensity for myself."  A couple of years later I found myself at CBGB's doing my best Noddy Holder." Joey Ramone

" When Slade broke in 1972, I began to get really nervous. Here I am killing myself to write the next incredible riff (and then I see) these four blokes pounding out four chords over and over and loving every minute of it.  I bought all of their albums and thought maybe I wanted to join the band. (Bands like) Slade really inspired me to get back to my root of inspiration:  heavy, intelligent but fun rock and roll." Ritchie Blackmore  (Deep Purple)

"Slade never compromised. We always had the feeling that they were on our side. I don't know but I think we were right." Steve Jones (The Sex Pistols)

"If you notice, around 1972 I started doing very different music. I couldn't do the heavy rock thing anymore. Noddy Holder was around kicking every singer in the ass.  I never wanted to be a pop singer. Christ, how I hated Noddy!" Tom Jones

“Slade was the coolest band in England.  They were the kind of guys that would push your car out of a ditch.” Alice Cooper

"Slade was never pretentious. It was just music to them. Pop, rock, soul....it was all the same to Slade. They wrote great songs.   And, besides, I'd like to raid their wardrobe." Noel Gallagher (Oasis)

"The whole punk rock thing really happened because of bands such as Slade and the like; rock bands that wouldn't back off." Paul Weller

"Absolutely. Slade! A band that would never bend over." Kurt Cobain (Nirvana)

"Whatever happened to bands that rocked liked Slade?  Y'know, that no-bullshit, fuck you, in your face, we're bad-as-hell-and-we-know-it kind of band?" David Coverdale (Whitesnake)

"The truth is, for this (New Musical Express) compilation (album) of cover songs, I wanted to record my version of Slade's  How Does It Feel  more than anything. Yet, Oasis had already chosen Cum On Feel The Noize .  NME feels that too much Slade is not a good thing.  Really?  I had to settle for the divine Mr. David Bowie. I did my best with second best! ha!" Roland Orzabal (Tears For Fears)

"I judge a good rock and roll 'encyclopedia' by whether or not Slade is included." Robert Christau (Rolling Stone & The Village Voice)

Vive le Rock Nov 2009

 

Slade

From UK

Listed under : Pop Rock 1970-1980

 

David : So many of todays bands would not exist had it not been for Slade paving the way. Oasis, The Who, Ozzy Osbourne all acknowledge Slade. Listen to 'Slade Alive' and then try and tell me Slade were not a great band.

How about Slade at Reading 1980? They blew the opposition off Stage. A band without a hit record for yonks, on the verge of splitting up, came and did what they did best, playing rock and enjoying it too. Between 1976 and 1980 Slade were having a rough time. Radio play was practically non-existant and guitarist Dave Hill was adamant at the time that he wanted nothing to do with Slade. He'd actually gone into the wedding car biz. Some sweet talking by then manager Chas Chandler, persuaded him to do Reading. The rest is history.What other band could get away with playing a Christmas song in the middle of summer? Never forget this band.There will never be another like it.

http://icbirmingham.icnetwork.co.uk/0100news/0100localnews/tm_objectid=12187038%26method=full%26siteid=50002-name_page.html

 

IC Birmingham 10.09.2002

By Staff Reporter, Evening Mail

 

Uni reunion for Slade

 

Midland Glam rockers Slade reunited for the first time in five years to be honoured for their contribution to the music industry.

Swapping their traditional garish outfits for mortar boards and gowns, the 70s band received an honorary fellowship from the University of Wolverhampton.

The group collected the award in front of around 300 graduates from the university's School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure, at the city's Grand Theatre.

Former lead singer Noddy Holder told the audience: "We were together for 25 years and I think we produced some of the best rock music ever in the history of rock. It is a great honour to get this."

Before the ceremony, Holder said he and the rest of the group - guitarist Dave Hill, bassist Jimmy Lea, who lives in Brewood, Staffordshire, and drummer Don Powell - had ruled out any possibility of a musical reunion.

Holder, who is from Walsall but now lives in Cheshire, said: "It's great to get back together. You're together for 25 years and it just seems like you never split up, but that's as far as it goes."

Of the fellowship, Holder, who is an MBE, replied: "It's a nice little honour, especially from your home town."

Slade recorded 17 top 20 hits between 1971 and 1976, including Cum On Feel the Noize, Merry Christmas Everybody, and Mama, Weer All Crazee Now.

 

http://icbirmingham.icnetwork.co.uk/0100news/0100localnews/tm_objectid=12186494%26method=full%26siteid=50002-name_page.html

 

IC Birmingham 10.09.2002

 

Mama, were all honoured now

 

Glam rockers Slade yesterday reunited for the first time in five years to be honoured by their home city for their contribution to the music industry.

Swapping their traditional garish outfits for mortar boards and gowns, the 70s band received an honorary fellowship from the University of Wolverhampton.

 

The group collected the award in front of around 300 graduates from the university's School of Sport, Performing Arts and Leisure, as well as friends and family, at the city's Grand Theatre.

Former lead singer Noddy Holder told the audience: "We were together for 25 years and I think we produced some of the best rock music ever in the history of rock. It is a great honour to get this."

Before the ceremony, Holder said he and the rest of the group - guitarist Dave Hill, bassist Jimmy Lea, who lives in Brewood, Staffordshire, and drummer Don Powell - had enjoyed lunch together, but ruled out any possibility of a musical reunion.

Holder, who is from Walsall but now lives in Cheshire, said: "It's great to get back together. You're together for 25 years and it just seems like you never split up, but that's as far as it goes for me."

Asked what it meant to be receiving an honorary fellowship, Holder, who is an MBE, replied: "It's a nice little honour, especially from your home town, for your contribution to the music industry."

Hill, who still lives in Wolverhampton, said: "It's fantastic to be brought together to be honoured."

Slade recorded 17 top 20 hits between 1971 and 1976, including Cum On Feel the Noize, Merry Christmas Everybody, and Mama, Weer All Crazee Now.

Slade at Calfornia Ballroom 24th June 1972, Dunstable, South England

 

CHAOS AT THE SLADE GIG

 

The night Slade were on in 1972 the place was packed to capacity. It was getting really hot as Bruce Benson was winding up his DJ marathon. The Ballroom could be hot at the best of times but that night there was no air at all. I was offstage by the side entrance door with my back against the door and my feet on the pillar trying to keep the groupies out. I lost count of the number of pregnant wives Noddy Holder supposedly had! When Slade first appeared out of the dressing room, my first thought was how small they were and my second was how terrified they looked when they saw the heaving mass squashed up against the stage.

They went on and the whole place went berserk. About 10 minutes into the act, bouncers were hauling fainting punters over the stage and depositing them on the floor in the artistes lounge. I went to see if I could do anything and there were bodies everywhere. One lad who was wearing one of the multi-coloured suede jackets so popular at the time, had steam coming off him.

I didn't see much of Slade on stage.... I spent the evening pouring water down kid's throats.

At the end of the gig, Slade went off, Paul Gray turned the disco decks back on and all the fuses blew. The gear was soaking wet.

Near hysteria at Slade concert

Luton News June 29, 1972

Scenes of young girls fainting and near hysteria swept through the California Ballroom on Saturday night as one of the largest crowds ever packed in to see top pop group Slade.

Over 1300 people jammed the dance floor. (see footnote) Exit doors were burst open as the crowd fought for air. Girls were hoisted high on boyfriend's shoulders clear of the crush. Resident disc jockey at the Cali - weekend haunt of hundreds of Luton teenagers - Bruce Benson said: "It was Beatlemania all over again". He made repeated requests during the evening for people to move away from the massive amplifiers in case they toppled under pressure.

The disc jockey said afterwards: "I saw several girls faint. I certainly cannot remember a bigger crowd". The crowd started a continuous "we want Slade" chant over an hour before the group - who's latest release 'Take me bak ome' is currently number two in the charts - appeared on stage.

Slade's lead guitarist Dave Hill said afterwards: "The audience reaction was tremendous but I felt really sorry for the kids. They were packed in like sardines.

Footnote: The California had a stated capacity of around 3000. The night of the Slade gig we believe there were around 3,500 in the Ballroom and probably another 500 in the bars and the car park.


Dave sketched by the webmaster at the California in 1972

http://www.california-ballroom.info/bands/slade.htm

 

 Famous brummy's - Noddy Holder

Born Neville John Holder in Walsall, England on June 15, 1946, Noddy was anything but ordinary even at the young age of two when he could recite every known nursery rhyme which was probably the launching pad for a personality destined to become one of the greatest showmen the world will ever see. Before he started school, he was already commanding center stage by entertaining the neighborhood children with his rendition of Al Jolson.


The next phase of his life would be the pursuit of a musical career which ultimately led to him becoming the driving force behind the legendary rock group, Slade. His entertaining stage presence and rapport with the audience commanded attention wherever he went and kept the band afloat even through the the less successful periods....an indication that there was far more depth to this entertainer than the music. He had his first experience as an actor on the big screen when Slade were cast in the semi-biographical movie called Flame. But he loved the music and continued doing it until he decided it was time to stop and focus on new horizons.


After his departure from Slade, He assumed the role of a DJ on Piccadilly Radio in Manchester while exploring other options which led to numerous television guest appearances and taping of commercials. Another major turning point came when he was cast as a music teacher in a television movie called *The Grimleys..The present finds him hosting his own entertainment venue on Granada TV's Men & Motors channel called Noddy's Electric Ladyland, a perfect setting for him to display his ever-popular sense of humor, an attribute which may have been fine-tuned throughout his musical career. In giving advice to prospective musicians he once revealed..**"Keep at it only if you love it one-hundred percent...and keep a sense of humor because there will be plenty of heartaches along the way".

Express & Star

Mr Doo show how it's done

Dec 3, 2002, 15:35

Black Country rock band Mr Doo played a storming set last night to be crowned as the best young live band in the region.

Green-haired singer Dave Jones, of Stourbridge, said that the group's performance at the Robin 2 in Bilston was "our best gig ever".

The band's loyal fans began the celebration party early as they boogied and conga danced through the 40-minute show.

Jimmy Lea from Black Country legends Slade presented the five-piece group, all in their early 20s, with the microphone-shaped trophy.

Mr Doo also landed a cheque for £1,000; 40 hours recording time at Icehouse Studios, Stourbridge; £150 for new musical equipment and a professional PA for use at any concert in the Midlands.

Mike Hamblett, owner of the Robin R'n'B Clubs, who organised the competition which involved 81 bands and started back in March said that it had been a fantastic night and the other finalists funk rock band The Sneekys from Dudley and Sutton Coldfield hard rockers Final Redemption had been just a few points behind in the marking.

http://www.expressandstar.com/millennium/1900/1950-1975/1973.html

 

Slade crack Christmas!

 

Part of Christmas, Slade from left: Dave Hill, Don Powell, Noddy Holder & Jimmy Lea.

They were the top supergroup of the early 70s and now all that was left was to conquer the Christmas chart and have the coveted number one spot over the festive season.

This Slade, whose members came from Walsall, Wolverhampton and Codsall, duly achieved in 1973 with what was thought to be their first title not to contain a spelling mistake - "Merry Christmas Everybody".

It reached the top spot within two weeks of release and at the time it was the fastest Christsmas seller since "Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer".

It is trotted out nearly every December and more than a quarter of a century later is still a nice little earner for Noddy Holder and co.

To many generations its first play on the radio heralds the proper start of Christmas.

They courted controversy in their ascent to stardom from their early years as first the 'N Betweens and later Ambrose Slade.

But like the Beatles before them their essential good nature shone through and it would have been a hard-faced critic who took any serious offence.

J Lyons, Foster Street, Walsall

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